FINE ART TOURIST: PITTSBURGH

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Carnegie museum of art

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The Carnegie Museum of Art was founded by industrialist and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie in 1895. Carnegie was a Scottish immigrant who arrived in America at age 13 with his family in 1848. Carnegie went to work shortly after his arrival as a bobbin boy in a mill, working six days a week, 12 hours a day for the equivalent of $35.00 a week in 2020 dollars.

By his 18th year, Carnegie was working at the Pennsylvania Railroad Company where he moved up quickly to become the Superintendent of the Western Division. Utilizing his connections made at the railroad Carnegie made investments in multiple industries, ultimately founding the Carnegie Steel Company. When he sold the company to JP Morgan, Carnegie became the wealthiest person in America for a period of time.

From that point forward, Carnegie devoted his life to philanthropy. He ultimately spent 90% of his fortune to start and fund a number of philanthropic and learning institutions including the Carnegie Museum of Art.

The CMOA is focused on contemporary art and has a significant collection of works by impressionist, post-impressionist, expressionist and realism painters. The museum also has galleries devoted to abstract artists such as Pollack and Rothko but frankly, abstract art is not art we enjoy.

We have included a sample of some of our favorite paintings from our visit to the CMOA during our recent stay in Pittsburgh. All of the photographs were taken at the museum by @FineArtTourist. We hope you enjoy the selection. Please let us know.

Be seeing you!

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Expressionism

Nature is not only all that is visible to the eye…it also includes the inner pictures of the soul.”
Girl Under Apple Tree (1904) Oil on Canvas. Edvard Munch
A painter paints the appearance of things, not their objective correctness. In fact, he creates new appearances of things.”
The Lighthouse of Fehmarn (1912) Oil on canvas. Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Realism

“When you paint, try to put down exactly what you see. Whatever else you have to offer will come out anyway.” The Wreck (1896) Oil on canvas. Winslow Homer

Post-Impressionism

I want to touch people with my art. I want them to say ‘he feels deeply, he feels tenderly’.”
Wheat Fields after the Rain (1890) Oil on canvas. Vincent van Gogh
What color is in a picture, enthusiasm is in life.” Le Moulin de la Galette (1886-1887)
Oil on canvas. Vincent van Gogh

Impressionism

“I do not always find the streets interesting, so I wait until I see picturesque groups and those that compose well in relation to the whole.”
Fith Avenue in Winter (1892) Oil on canvas. Childe Hassam
“Colors pursue me like a constant worry. They even worry me in my sleep. ”
The Sea at Le Havre (1868) Oil on canvas. Claude Monet
“The art of the colorist has in some ways elements of mathematics and music.”
Place des Lices, St. Tropez (1893) Oil on canvas. Paul Signac
Color! What a deep and mysterious language, the language of dreams.” Landscape with Three Figures (1901) Oil on canvas. Paul Gaugin

“The richness I achieve comes from nature, the source of my inspiration.”
Water Lilies (1915-1926) Oil on canvas. Claude Monet

Blessed are they who see beautiful things in humble places where other people see nothing.
The Great Bridge (1896) Oil on canvas. Camille Pissarro

Price to Torrey

Today we traveled from Price to Torrey where we will be staying while exploring Capitol Reef National Park. Along the way we traveled through the northern section of the San Rafael Swell to visit the Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry which has one of the largest and densest concentrations  of dinosaur fossils ever found.

From there we traveled further south with the intent of driving through the Buckhorn Wash to visit the Wedge (aka the Little Grand Canyon) but rain overnight made the sand and dirt roads impassable. Instead we ventured south on Route 72 which took us through Fishlake National Forest and over the summit at Hogan’s Pass where we encountered gale force winds and snow.

Tomorrow we begin our hiking at Capitol Reef National Park.

 

Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry

DSC_0038Paradise Valley, Fishlake National Forest

DSC_0051Foy Bench 8975 Elevation

DSC_0057Cathedral Valley

DSC_0065Torrey, Utah

Browning, MT

With cold temperatures and rain showers in the forecast we elected not to hike today. We took a road trip over to Browning to visit the Museum of the Plains Indians. The museum is located within the Blackfeet Tribal Indian Reservation which spans approximately 1.5 million acres. The Blackfeet Indians owned the land that now constitutes Glacier National Park until it was purchased by the federal government in 1895.

The museum has many artifacts from various Plains Indian tribes – clothing, jewelry, weapons, tools, household items and musical instruments. The displays were very informative and interesting.

We met several Blackfeet artists that were working at the museum today. A jewelry maker named Rene Bear Medicine and a young artist named Jeremy (self taught).

From Browning we looped around to East Glacier where we stopped for a late lunch at the Two Medicine Grill. We then drove back to St. Mary on MT 49 known locally as Looking Glass Hill Road. The road provides tremendous views of Two Medicine Lake and the valley below when the weather is clear. It is a curvy mountain road that is closed from November through April because of snow and frequent landslides. MT 49 is cattle country and we encountered many cattle on and along the road which along with the many hairpin turns makes it a slow but exhilarating trip.

A relaxing day and a chance to rest our tired legs.

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